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Landline services partially restored in Kashmir

IT Tehelka

Landline connections have been made operational on Saturday in 17 telephone exchanges in the Kashmir Valley, the officials said. The phone lines were restored after a period of about 12 days of lockdown. Seventeen out of a little over 100 telephone
'Landline connections have been made operational on Saturday in 17 telephone exchanges in the Kashmir Valley, the officials said. The phone lines were restored after a period of about 12 days of lockdown. Seventeen out of a little over 100 telephone exchanges in Kashmir were made operational. According to officials, 20 more exchanges would be operationalised soon. The landline services have been restored in Sonamarg, Budgam and Manigam areas of central Kashmir.  The services have been restored in Gurez, Tangmarg, Uri Keran Karnah and Tangdhar areas of north Kashmir. In Srinagar, exchanges are back in the Civil Lines area, Cantonment area and near the airport. Meanwhile, mobile internet services have been restored in five districts of Jammu region. Telephone line services, including mobile phones and landlines were suspended on August 5 when the Central government abrogated Article 370 that gave special status to Jammu and Kashmir and also split into two Union Territories — Jammu and Kashmir, and Ladakh.'

J&K: Landline services on more than 50,000 phones restored in Kashmir, says report

IT Scroll.in

Seventeen out of the more than 100 telephone exchanges are now operational, authorities said.
'Authorities in Kashmir restored services on over 50,000 landline phones in 17 telephone exchanges in the region on Saturday morning, PTI reported. The phone lines had not been operational for more than 10 days. The 17 exchanges included those in Srinagar district’s Civil Lines, Cantonment and airport areas, central Kashmir’s Budgam, Sonamarg and Manigam districts, and north Kashmir’s Gurez, Tangmarg, Uri Keran Karnah and Tangdhar areas. In south Kashmir, landline services were made operational in Qazigund and Pahalgam. Twenty more exchanges will be operational soon, officials told PTI. Meanwhile, 2G mobile internet services have been restored in five districts of Jammu region, according to ANI – Jammu, Reasi, Samba, Kathua and Udhampur. All communication lines were snapped in Jammu and Kashmir on August 4, a day before the central government revoked the state’s special status and split the state into two Union territories. These territories will come into effect on October 31. While restrictions were lifted in Jammu earlier this week, Kashmir Valley has been under an unprecedented security and information clampdown. Several political leaders, including former chief ministers Omar Abdullah and Mehbooba Mufti , are under detention. Earlier on Friday, the state administration said restrictions in the Kashmir Valley would be eased in the coming days “in an orderly way”, and that 12 of the 22 districts were now functioning.. Read more'

MUSIC: The New Way For Scientists To Transfer Data

IT TechQuila

A team of researchers at ETH Zurich recently developed technology to store data using music or rather, musical notes (the access data is transferred through music) that are imperceptible to the human ear but a smartphone can easily interpret it.
'A team of researchers at ETH Zurich recently developed technology to store data using music or rather, musical notes (the access data is transferred through music) that are imperceptible to the human ear but a smartphone can easily interpret it.Common wireless communication technologies, like Bluetooth, make the use of radio waves in order to transmit data between devices.However, the pairing of devices is essential in order to share files or photos via Bluetooth.Scientists have now considered a bizarre possibility for data transfer – Music!Researchers at ETH Zurich have come up with a new technology which uses a very simple medium: sound.With cell phones already equipped with a built-in microphone (to pick up audio data from a piece of music) thus decoding the data could be as simple as downloading a smartphone app that contains the algorithm developed by the ETH Zurich team. (The application is not publicly available yet though). Data transfer through music LISNR , a start-up company wants to replace NFC and QR codes with a new technology that sends data over audio — a communication protocol called Smart Tone.The technology can be used across a number of applications like ticketing and authentication, offline messaging, device to device connectivity and more.Often, the receiving device will also send a Smart Tone back to the original broadcasting device enabling two-way communications.LISNR actually uses the audio frequency range of ~18.7 kHz to 19.2 kHz for its communications and that is inaudible to 98 per cent of people. (those who can hear it, the audio sounds like white noise anyways).The idea to transfer data via audio isn’t brand new. “Google Nearby” uses this for sharing data between devices, as a rival to Apple’s “AirDrop”. Another company called CHIRP is also doing data over audio.LISNR With companies like Chirp and LISNR experimenting with sound wave data transmission for about a decade, what sets the Zurich team apart is their mission to integrate data into music without affecting the pleasure of listening.The scientists used notes at very high frequencies, so high that the human ear barely registers them, to signal where the decoder algorithm should look for data.In the words of Manuel Eichelberger, an ETH doctoral student –                          “When we hear a loud note, we don’t notice quieter notes with a slightly higher or lower frequency, that means we can use the dominant, loud notes in a piece of music to hide the acoustic data transfer.” A loud piece of music like this one is ideal for data transfer because it has a lot of dominant frequencies.Pop and rock songs usually work well!For reference, in a listening test when the participants were asked to distinguish between original and modified versions, Queen’s “The Show Must Go On” and Van Halen’s “And The Cradle Will Rock” both did extremely well.Surprisingly, more than 40 per cent of participants couldn’t identify the modifications, which is pretty high considering they were actively looking for suspicious sounds.The ETH team figured out that the data transfer rate realistically would be closer to 200 bits per second since some repetition of data is needed to ensure accuracy and quality.Considering the trade-off between the transfer rate, quality of data, and quality of music, this technology works best for short and simple pieces of data, like Wi-Fi passwords.Have you heard about proximity marketing?Proximity marketing refers to communicating with customers at the right place and at the right time with highly relevant and personalized messages on their smartphones, it could be a greeting at the entry points, special offers in the store or getting feedback on a new product.It’s another industry where sharing data through music comes handy.Someday, you might be able to receive special promotions or product information via music played over a store’s speakers.With background music and smartphone users, the potentiality is enormous.Interested in more?Click here to explore. . The post MUSIC: The New Way For Scientists To Transfer Data appeared first on TechQuila .'

Broadcasters Misused Tariff Order to Throttle Discovery of Channel Prices: TRAI

IT thewire.in

TRAI had notified the 'New Regulatory Framework' for Broadcasting and Cable services in March 2017. It gave freedom to consumers to select the television channels of their choice.
'New Delhi:  Asserting that distributors misused the new tariff order to throttle market discovery of TV channel prices, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) on Friday sought views of all stakeholders after problems connected with pricing and selection of channels came to the fore. In March 2017, TRAI had notified the ‘New Regulatory Framework’ for Broadcasting and Cable services. The new framework came into effect on December 29, 2018. TRAI’s new regulations or orders for the television and broadcasting sector gave freedom to consumers to select the television channels of their choice. Analysis reveals that the new regulatory framework has brought transparency in TV channel pricing, harmonised business processes in the sector, and reduced disputes among stakeholders, but adequate choice to select TV channels has not been given to the consumers, TRAI said in a statement. The telecom regulator has issued a consultation paper on tariff related issues for broadcasting and cable services. A lot was expected from the broadcasters and the Distribution Platform Operators (DPOs) to use flexibility given under new regulatory framework to address the concerns and aspirations of the consumers, TRAI said. However, the given flexibility was misused to throttle market discovery of TV channel prices by giving huge discounts on the bouquets, it said. Also read:  CVC Starts Investigating Delay Behind DoT Action on Penalising Three Telecom Players It has been observed from the tariff declared by the broadcasters under the new regulatory framework that they are offering bouquets at a discount of up to 70 % of the sum of a-la-carte rates of pay channels constituting those bouquets, the statement said. It indicates that in the absence of any restriction on the discount on the offering of bouquets, broadcasters are making prices of a-la-carte channels illusory thereby impacting the a-la-carte choice of channels by consumers, it said. TRAI said no restriction on the number of channels has created another problem wherein broadcasters and DPOs are offering too many bouquets. It said it has observed that too many bouquets are formed by the broadcasters or distributors and many of them contain very similar set of channels, with very few changes. Too many bouquets are not only creating confusion among consumers but also becoming a hurdle in choosing of channels by consumers, the sector regulator said. The consumers get confused and as a result are forced to adopt some suggested packs of TV channels which kill the freedom given to them to choose the desired TV channels, TRAI said. Also read:  How Reliance Jio’s Entry Tied Regulatory Knots Around India’s Telecom Ecosystem TRAI held extensive interactions with stakeholders including consumers and consumer organisations, at various forums, wherein stakeholders have also raised certain issues such as variable Network Capacity Fee (NCF) for different regions, NCF for Multi TV home, discount on long term plan, DD channels as part of one hundred channels etc. In order to deliberate upon the above issues that have come post implementation of the new regime, the consultation paper has been floated seeking stakeholders’ views, TRAI said. This paper primarily discusses issues related to discount given in the formation of the bouquet, ceiling price of channels for inclusion in bouquet, need for formation of bouquet by broadcasters and DPOs, variable NCF and discount on long term plan, it said. These issues are significant in terms of consumer welfare and it is considered appropriate to obtain the views of the stakeholders, TRAI said. (PTI)'