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Queer Community of J&K Won't Enjoy Any Greater Freedom, Says LGBTQ+ Collective

LGBTQ thewire.in

The Queer Muslim Project has held up a mirror to the conditions of queer peoples' acceptance of Kashmir's unique predicament.
'New Delhi: In a gesture of solidarity and noting that no identities operate in a vacuum, The Queer Muslim Project has released a statement against the reading down of Article 370 in Jammu and Kashmir , and the “false national pride” at play in people’s reactions to the Centre’s decision. Taking off from American poet Audre Lorde’s lines on there being “no such thing as a single-issue struggle,” the collective’s statement thoroughly takes down the revocation and also the lines of celebratory praise issued by many LGBTQ+ individuals and groups in reaction to it. “Such a position appropriates the voices of queer and transgender people from Kashmir while creating a smokescreen of rainbow solidarity,” it says. Also read | Echoes of China: Unpacking the Mythology of the End of Article 370 The Project holds up a mirror to the conditions of queer peoples’ acceptance of Kashmir’s unique predicament and essays the basic violations of several rights of the residents of Jammu and Kashmir. “Effectively, the stand of celebration by a section of the queer community on the pretext that the LGBTQ+ community from Kashmir will enjoy greater freedom for their sexual and gender expression now, pinkwashes the ever going struggle of Kashmiri people against grave injustice, violence and oppression – a struggle that has impacted generations after generations of Kashmir.” The statement warns against the appropriation of voices from the Valley, while at once lending support to LGBTQ people struggling to assert themselves there. It expresses hope in the constitution and in the eventual future when all opinions will be heard on an equal platform. Also read | Ground Report: Angry Kashmir Empty on Eid as Restrictions Return to Srinagar “Resistance and struggle against all forms of oppression and marginalisation is important. Our contention is to not mistake one right bigger than the other,” the statement reads, recognising that the situation unfolding in the Valley sets the stage for a far more deep seating violation of rights. Quoting the Urdu poet Faiz Ahmad Faiz in all his poignance, the statement also notes that “this is not the morning we are waiting for.” Several thinkers, politicians and public personas have come forward with letters and statements of condemnation as the Centre’s Kashmir decision completes a week. In this time, the virtual communications blackout over Kashmir has not been lifted.'

Sperm production may be possible in transgenders: Study

LGBTQ Bilkul Online

New York, Aug 8: Researchers have reported two cases in which young transgender women attempted to recover their fertility after stopping gender-affirming medications. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that one transgender woman
'New York, Aug 8: Researchers have reported two cases in which young transgender women attempted to recover their fertility after stopping gender-affirming medications. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that one transgender woman was able to produce viable sperm after a few months of discontinuing her puberty-halting medication whereas a different patient on hormone therapy could not produce sperm during the time she could psychologically tolerate being off her medication. “We were interested in examining the timeline for getting viable sperm after stopping masculinity-suppressing medication,” said lead author Hanna Valli-Pulaski, Assistant Professor at Magee-Womens Research Institute.  “Going on and off gender-affirming medications can cause psychological distress in this population and it’s important patients have a discussion with their health care provider before starting or stopping any treatment,” Valli-Pulaski added. For the study, the research team examined medical records of two transgender women who tried to preserve their sperm after stopping hormone therapy and compared their semen quality against eight other transgender women who elected to preserve their sperm before beginning therapy.  All of the participants came through the Fertility Preservation Program in Pittsburgh between 2015 and 2018 as young adults. One of the patients who elected to preserve their sperm after beginning therapy had been taking the drug Lupron — a sex hormone blocker that halts puberty when taken in adolescence — for six months. She elected to stop taking Lupron to attempt sperm cryopreservation.  Five months later, she was able to produce a sperm sample comparable to those collected from the eight transgender women who saved their sperm prior to undergoing treatment. According to the researchers, for male-to-female transgender individuals, facial hair can start to sprout and the voice begin to deepen after just a few months of stopping medication. It’s possible to reverse these effects, but it would take time.'